About your Search

20121112
20121120
SHOW
Cavuto 14
Today 13
( more )
STATION
SFGTV2 114
SFGTV 81
CNNW 46
FBC 44
CNN 42
CNBC 39
CSPAN 39
CSPAN2 38
FOXNEWS 22
MSNBCW 22
MSNBC 19
KQED (PBS) 18
KNTV (NBC) 17
WETA 16
KRCB (PBS) 14
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 739
Search Results 89 to 188 of about 739 (some duplicates have been removed)
demonstrate i can do well in this environment. we get letters from hotel management says, no, no, this person did well, they were perfectly fine. we use that as a way to get people back in permanent housing. but we want to keep the threshold as low as possible to help people who have been on the streets sometimes for years to get into housing. >> (inaudible). >> denise, you had a xwe. >> i will thank you both for being here. i was curious, i want to hear from the client perspective, what kind of feedback do you get from your clients that go through this program? >> i guess we can address it both ways. >> yes, whoever, thank you. >> for the stablization program overwhelmingly it's a positive response. people are happy to have a room that, we ask paepl to save up money but they don't have it pay for the room. there are complaints, there are complaints about bedbugs, there are complaints about people in the space using drugs and alcohol. these are private hotels and we don't have control over every single unit in the hotel. there are people that come into the hotel to sell drugs. this i
entirely different. >> wind turbines in an urban environment is a relatively new concept. there are a few buildings in other major cities where they have installed wind turbines on the roof. and wind turbines in buildings are effective. >> the discussion was do we do that or not? and the answer was, of course. if they're not perfect yet, they're building a building that will last 100 years. in 100 years someone is going to perfect wind efficient turbines. if these aren't right, we'll replace them. we have time to do that. >> the building that's two renewable energy generations. wind turbines located on the north facade. two different levels of photo volume takes. >> we have over 600 solar panels and three platforms on the building, and four integrated wind turbines. the wind turbines and the solar panels produce 7% of the building's energy. and we're reducing the use of energy here by 32% in the office building. >> the entire building is controlled by a complex computer system which monitors and adjusts air, heating and lights as well as indoor shades. >> the building is going to be a sma
of environment. i was wondering if the department of real estate is thinking in the future, if there are other ways that we can borrow money for these tenant improvements at a lower interest rate. >> well, that's a very good question, and it's timely. because we are seeing this more and more frequently. and the reason we're seeing it more frequently is that the market is changing and there is less of an allowance provided by landlord than there was when the market was softer. so as this market continues to heat up there is less advantage to a tenant. and because of that, then we have to amortize our improvement costs. the challenge we have is each one of these individual deals is have fairly small so we're not talking about a large sum of money which we would normally think of in terms of a certificate of participation, or other fiscal mechanism we might have to borrow funds at very competitive rates. so we're in a market just like any other tenant is in the market. and what landlords will charge is in this 8% range. we do our best to negotiate something lower but that's where the market stand
is this is a unique environment just like you guys were saying, unique environment, has difficulties that are inherent in the fact it is unique the way it works with the board and the commissions and the mayor. this is not an easy place. they need to understand the search environment -- the searcher needs to understand whoever they are recommending has to be someone who has some experience or familiarity that this is politically charged. so it was trying to make it a pc way of saying, you know, san francisco, that we're special. >> okay, commissioner lee. >> just to give me an idea, i understand some of these firms are prequalified from out of state, possibly, but how many firms that we contact that were, like you said, prequalified, how many firms got this notice? >> there were 10 prequalified firms and all 10 got it. and the firms, the last firm that i used when we went through this in 2007-8 time frame is also one of the prequalified. and many of the firms have experience recent, very recent and on-going meaning right now experience with the recruiting for positions high up. because these are no
environment. indoor air quality, energy, water, materials and resources, and sustainable sites are the five categories for the lead. you can go for several gold or platinum certifications. >> the city wanted to be silver lead status. . maybe gold was a stretch. and people said, if we're going to be a sustainable organization that the pucs this has got to be the top of the line. it's got to be a lead platinum building. what does that mean to us? we run water, power, and sewer. so, those are some of the biggest things involved in lead platinum. ♪ ♪ >> by late 2008 the project, as we got the contractor on board and we were able to start pricing it, we're a multi-, multi-, multi-million dollar over budget. >> the story a lot of people don't know after we got select today do this project, the first price we came in with was $180 million. and the city said, you know, this is a great building, but we just don't want to spend that much money. so, the project was on the verge of being canceled. >> if you're looking at why this building came to be, in many ways it also included mayor gavin newsom
to pass comprehensive legislation, a couple of weeks ago, tony testified in front of the environment and public works committee on why we need to pass and get the safe cosmetics out there on the floor of that senate, he did a fantastic job and i stole this off the video which is archiving, you can watch it, and this act would call for quick action on the chemicals of greatest concern, would increase access to basic health and safety information on chemicals, would use the best science to assess safety, so not old science but new science, would seek to protect vulnerable populations like we talked about way back when, right, prenatally and in pregnancy, those ones that are maybe more vulnerable to chemical exposures and also to reduce exposures in communities with unfair burden of exposures, we know that very often, poor communities, communities of color, communities with less resources are exposed to higher levels of chemicals so we have to reduce that unfair burden because they already have enough unfair burden, so that calls for some comprehensive changes and we want to see those h
and i think what you are probably saying is, you know, maybe we should consider very severe environments in case of a disaster which personally i think that's how we train and probably most of your environments. maybe you want to start from a place of more limitations rather than less and one of them is not doing that kind of coordination via cell phone. again, i think this was, last year there was a table top, this is the first time we're actually doing a drill. there's reason for growth and as bijon said, maybe next year we are meshing xhapld and control so command and control is done over the exercise com link and keeping it separate. i think the point is well taken that the recommendation i made, i think we can introduce more rigor into the execution of the com drills next year. >> any other questions? panelists, thank you very much, i appreciate it. let's give them a big round of applause. (applause). >> something that took place yesterday was our medical exchange. rob is going to give you a summary of how that went and at the same time we're going to bring up some additional pane
and organizeterrorist attack. that's unacceptable in today's environment. >> schieffer: do you have any answers yet as to why-- we know that they had asked to maintain their-- the current level of security and that was turned down. do we have any idea on what that decision was based on? >> no, and we're still getting to the bottom of that. that's one of my primary concerns. and that's certainly what i'm driving. first of all, why there was failure for adequate security at the temporary mission. and secondly, why they didn't assess the security risks posed to that facility? they had abundance of threat reports and incidents, both to that facility and other consulates that would have suggested that they were in a high-threat environment. i sponsored-- i cosponsored the initial legislation-- i was the lead republican in the house-- to create the diplomat security bureau and the accountability review board that also has been initiate so we can get to the bottom of who is responsible. there was minimal security. the barriers weren't sufficient. the attackers, the mob, overran the complex. the militia we
cooperation. many want to throw it against the wall. it's not a conducive environment >> there's a lot of reasons to be concerned. if if you want to fill in texas that community tactfully. you know what, health and innovation now, we are going to need immigration lawyers. america has not come to grips with the risk issue in hell. it's going to take risk, and right now, we live in a risk-averse environment and a government environment that can take risks. in many ways they are afraid they will get criticized in the press or media. neil: they said businesses to risks and we ended up bailing them out, so we are averse to risk and that the ma because every time they do this, we pay for it. >> and health and medicine, we're going to have to take risks and figure out how to create new drugs and create new innovation. neil: synonymous with simona mr. conaway what you're talking about? >> there's there is a difference between the weather and climate. it's raining today, it's not raining tomorrow. the climate is the key. are there problems in healh and medicine? you bet. we need to figure out h
to address what needs to be done in that environment. none of that is done without our dependence and involvement in the cyber war. technology drives everything we do. the internet has made is more connected than at any other time. the vast majority of our infrastructure reside in private sector. let me repeat that. the vast majority of our infrastructure reside in the private sector. the national security risks and the economic risks are still with the private sector. the government does not do it alone. they do it in concert with our partners and our partners are the private sector. for those of you were talking to earlier, with the work for the government or the private sector, you can contribute no matter where you are in whatever your professional desire is. this private-sector holds a lot of data and these are pretty profound -- their protection of the priorities is he has a list of priorities. this is the top five. the cyber threat is among the most serious challenges we face as a nation, and america's prosperity will depend on cyber security. the united states does have a
subsidizing a technology that destroys the environment in the name of saving the environment. for example, for the same -- it would take a row of 50 wind turbines from the appalachian trail to maine, that's 178 miles, to produce the same amount of electricity that four nuclear reactors would produce. the best way, mr. president, to produce cheap, clean energy in the united states is to let the marketplace do it, let the marketplace do it, not to subsidize jobs for technology that can stand on its own and produces only a small amount of unreliable electricity. so, mr. president, let's use this week to celebrate but let's celebrate the end of the temporary 21-year-old wind production tax credit and use the $12.1 billion saved to reduce the federal debt. thank you, mr. president. i yield the floor. a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from louisiana. ms. landrieu: thank you, mr. president. i have come to the floor to speak just briefly about a very exciting opportunity and occurrence that we celebrate and honor every november, and that is the opportunity to adopt chil
. and in that environment, you have then the ejection of alpha, beta and gamma particles. so it's almost simple geometry. right now, this particle we'd call an alpha particle. this is a helium nucleus. and i'll write that helium nucleus like this. and i'll put a two down here and a four here. and this nomenclature, i hope you're familiar with. this is simply the atomic number. it tells you it's atomic number two in the periodic table of substances, yeah? it's got two positive charges. and the four refers to the atomic mass unit. and that's the number of nucleons altogether. i call this, by the way, nucleons. i can call you a people, a person, but a person can be a male or female. nucleon can be a proton or neutron. see what i'm saying? but there's four nucleons altogether, so it has a mass of four and atomic number two. so that would be the configuration. if i put another proton in there, then it would now be-- does anyone know? it would be the element lithium because now it would have three and up here would be five. and any nucleus that has three protons, by definition and by chemical properties, will
. just very fortunate. it's a great environment. you know, i think we've seen over the past couple of years how passionate our fans are. i'm fortunate to play in san francisco and couldn't be more honored to have my name alongside the previous winners. i tons and tons of credit to our head trainer and the rest of the training staff and the doctors that put me back together and like i say again, i think this is an award that will be shared with everybody within the organization. >> lot of friend and family to support him as well. he finished with 27 of the 32 possible first place votes. ryan brawn finished second and andrew mccutchen was third in voting. not a bad year for bay area baseball. world series crown, the american league manager and today the national league most valuable player is buster posey. it's been quite a year in the bay area. >> it sure has. leesburg, georgia that's where buster was with the entire town behind him it looked like. >>> now to the weather. rain as we've been telling you for days is in the forecast and yes, it's here for the weekend. jeff ranieri is h
municipal bond etfs. my question to you is, in this environment, with the economic environment, with the possibility of a compromise regarding the fiscal cliff, vis-a-vis the increase revenues and cuts in spending, what is your analysis and your opinion on the tax free municipal bonds at this juncture? >> you have to buy them. the individual is going to go right back them and move them up. i think that's a great place to be. don't touch them. i want you to buy them. brilliant idea. now we go to paul in louisiana. paul? >> caller: hey, jim. thanks for taking my call. >> no problem. >> caller: i've been just getting in and sticking with a stock itw. i've been following it for a couple months. they seem to be doing pretty well. there is going to be a change in the leadership. can you comment? >> david spear passed away which is -- he was a terrific guy. this is a very well run company. i suspect that they won't really skip a beat. it's always been a favorite of mine. i would continue to own it. i wouldn't buy it off this. he's a good man. i think it's fine. i think it is fine. is
do under a canopy of 0, redwood, pine, and eucalyptus. chill out and this environment and you might see butterflies and dandelions. blue jays fly between the eucalyptus. it is ada accessible. public transit is plentiful. six, 24, or 71 bus. we have conquered the steps, we walked the dogs, and we have enjoyed a beautiful view the park has to offer. this is the place to take someone special and enjoyed a beautiful look out. " come to corona heights, located in the heart of this district. it offers a spectacular view of the downtown skyline, the bay bridge, and the east bay. the park is one of the best kept secrets. unlike twin peaks, it is hardly ever crowded. on any given day, you will run into a few locals. hop on a 37 bus to get there with that any parking worries. locals can bring their dogs to run with other dogs. there is also grass for small dogs. >> it is a great place. it is a wonderful place for the city to provide these kind of parks. the dog owners appreciate it. >> take time to notice the wildflowers on the grassland. and keep your head on the lookout for hawks and other
to protect all of us and create a crime free environment for americans. if the u.s. state agency see pakistani or yemen were afghan citizens they are not operating to protect or suppress the crime of those countries directing in the u.s. interest so they can't claim to be acting in the interest of the afghan herger when they see a man the bundled him off and put him nsl for days and days and days so they are more limited, they have less justification for doing what they are doing. they have more liberty of operating working with domestic citizens. >> professor skerker, waterboarding became a big issue a couple years ago in iraq and afghanistan war is waterboarding in morrill? >> i believe this. it's been used against someone who isn't being violent. further the assumption is that this fiscal discomfort like somebody speak the truth there is no correlation to and causing pain or discomfort or making somebody speak the truth is there for it is disproportionate and disconnected you are hurting somebody in the hope they reveal to you the truth and morality is any time you use christa tec
not communicate with the officers. they are in a precarious situation. they worked at a much closer environment and they cannot be perceived as a snitch. or that they are working with the police department. they are there to, down, emotionally, the anchor. what they do then, we have a shooting war homicide. and they go to the hospital to be with the families. any talk of retaliation -- they will work with our social workers at the hospital. and whether the retaliation must go next. to saturate and prevent and interrupt any violence that may occur. this is a component or peace that has been building. i polled the captains of payview, mission, ingleside and the northern district. these are the most affected by gang violence. they said they appreciated what the crn did what they want to see them more. they need to fill that communication. it also comes down to training and trust, to be able to have them talk to officers. they would address the officers, they had arrested some of them, when there were actually under. they will help the police and the community. under his guidance we are the most ac
's your take? >> i think those numbers are actually not that bad considering it's been a tough environment. on the bottom line, two cents better shows that the company's actually operating a little better. the issue, really, is related to the stock, which is underperformed so far. it's down 6% last year. down 6% again this year. operationally, they are doing a better job. they also boosted their dividend. when we talk to investors, there seems to be a buyer strike at the moment. investors are concerned about networking and whether that entire market can become monetized and cisco's margins will be decreased. i think what's more important are the details of whether cisco can convince investors that the company can compete in an environment which is becoming increasingly software centric. >> now, you know that gross margins have slid over the past few years. what would signal a reversal in that trend? >> that's a good point. at its peak, gross margins were about 70%. last quarter, they were about 62%. i think more software, better products, and better engineersiengineering of a lot of these
if they emit fewer carbons they can sell to other companies. so they will protect the environment and raise a billion dollars. the commerce has filed a lawsuit. >>> and we have an update into the questionable spending of public money at the port of oakland. administrators e-mailed us saying, he will not receive money in exchange for retirement. and the mayor is on administrative leave and he has left the country and following a ktvu investigation in which reuncoverred expenses at attention as strip club. >>> and a burglary, thieves stole honor guard items over the weekend. they say they have a lot of symbolic value and they are even eusually given to the families of fallen -- they are usually given to the families of fallen firefighters. >>> somebody broke in to the history fall are you. but it includes valuable items from the gold rush era. police responding within four minutes. >> unfortunately they knew what they were looking for and they had identified the objects and came very well prepared. they were very quick. >> a man was arrested outside put did not have any the 0 stolen items. >>
, eventually, the emphasis is on eventually in this ticktock environment. not tomorrow but eventually. maybe a little bit tomorrow. let me just say that we're now going through a process. it's a process that's not unlike what happened last year when we faced the debt ceiling fiasco. everything's based on washington, isn't it? we fell 19% peak to trough before avoiding that catastrophe in the knick of time. and during that decline it didn't matter what you bought. you initially lost money regardless. it turned out to be, though, and this is the operative term for me, not just fiscal cliff, no pain no gain. it was a no pain no gain scenario. i think it's going to be this way this time around scenario too. no pain no gain. today we found ourselves in the thick of the you're going to lose money even on the best of stocks moment. i'm not going to deny it. when you have cisco report a magnificent quarter of tremendous guidance and you hardly get a gain, when you see a stock like home depot headed below where it was when it reported stellar results yesterday you have to accept that earnings alone c
. >> glen canyon park is an extremely special and diverse environment with the mix of natural amendties and others. >> the challenge that the public has before them with any, capital project is to balance those. it is a very large park, 67 acres. the renovation is focused at the southern end of the park and i want to show you that the yellow zone that is indicated there and this permit is only addressing that area of the park. the renovation project is focused on the southern end, and closest to the center, the most active portion of the park, which is where the well-used and well-loved ball fields, rec center, including the gym, playground and two tennis courts and provide active opportunities for the public. the project which is funded for the 2008 clean and safe neighbor parks bond would provide a much-needed improvement to the park. here is some images of the different facilities all of which are very out of date and in poor condition. the project will provide much-needed improvement to the park including a larger children's play area, new tennis courts and improved paths and entran
it was a headache and eye sore because it was a dump and literacy for environment brought a group of their students out to check out what was going on at the power plant and those young people came out here and saw a park and a wetlands and they went back and they said "we want to work with the port to clean that up because we want to learn how to build a wetlands" and what you see today is the vision of those young people that was supported by community members, the tenants on the port, the industrial activity on the port, as well as the port, and all of the other city agencies that were required for this happen, so i want us to really celebrate partnership. there are many times when we're at each other's throats. every everybody who is a city employee around here knows that i am really happy to let lose and complain and criticize. all of that is part of making sure that what we wind up with is the best for the city and this is an example of that. we worked hard. we fought with the bike coalition because we want to make sure whatever bike path went down cargo way, cargo way okay was going to
in modern life. they're also the key to creating virtual reality. computer simulated environments allow us to experience imaginary scenes or overlay graphics on real world images. even today he continues to focus on the field of visualization. the question of how to see objects that do no exist in the real world. >> i don't know that seeing is essential but it's clear it's a large part of what human beings do, to see and interpret what they see. >> reporter: his realization that to see se to think goes back to his early childhood over 70 years ago. >> how did your parents affect your way of thinking? very much. my mother was really an educator and she told me when i was an infant, we gave me two hard boiled eggs. one of them was warm and the other was co. they looked exactly the same. this was a wonderful experience for a baby because they will very much the same but very different. >> reporter: thanks to his father, an engineer, he became interested in machines at an early age. at 16 he built a robotic mouse that could find its way through a maize. in 1963 at the age of 25, he develod a n
national service, immigration, transportation, the environment, and high-tech issues. >> he is also the greatest karaoke sing their -- singer and all of congress. -- in all of congress. [applause] >> he just told me i had five minutes. what do you think of this program? [applause] it is about time. i want to thank francis and fong. i think this is the very first statewide heritage month held with the mayor of san francisco. let me say something about heritage month in san francisco and your mayor. in the old days, you remember san francisco was known for passing all of these anti- chinese ordinances to limit the movement, the productivity of chinese in the city. we know two things. change happens. maybe the state of california is the state of golden opportunities, where we have a chinese-american mayor of san francisco. 35 years ago, congress members passed similar resolutions in both house and the senate to formally recognize the first 10 days of may as asian-pacific heritage week. one year later, president jimmy carter signed into law a joint resolution to officially designate the
that may be hoarding cash to protect themselves in this uncertain environment but does that mean, likely, they're going to spend that cash or put it to work once we get a resolution of the fiscal cliff? >> it all depends on how it gets resolved. if obama gets his way, and we get big tax increases on small businesses, but also increased double taxation of dividends and capital gains, we'll have a less friendly economic environment for investment to car inside the united states. and that would mean an incentive for companies not to conduct business here. maybe to expand their branchs and their operations overseas. yes, there's the short-term uncertainty in the fiscal cliff that's hurting, but then i actually agree with michael. it's long-term fundamentals that matter. our government is just too much of a burden. >> steve, what's at stake here? >> i want to talk about two scientists from two different fields. one is pav lolov. a dog would salivate when you put food in hem. ed prescott took that idea and said, you know what, when companies spend, they spend after and during recessions when t
and participate in our first panel, business creating a healthy safe and inclusive environment for all school students, the role of our federal government. tom perez, assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. she was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bri
and a people and it's not just a one-off. >> what does it take? >> the thing about changing the environment again, changing the social norms, it helps to understand there are primarily about 5 different ways we can influence and warm the climate of a school or community, students being one, families and parents, staff, policies and young people themselves. if we can understand that strategickly, sort of get down out of the big conversation and look at ways how do we, as you said, educate the educators, make sure they receive the education and understand that relationships are as important as the classroom can urriculum, especially at the secondary level, continue to hammer out policies that are not so punitive but restore we want to connect to correct. we don't want to punish. we often move kids from one environment it another but it doesn't help them make right and it doesn't help others. this is a systemic problem, it's not going to go away. but we can begin and we are, the people on this panel, those of you in this room, we're taking incremental steps. but one of the things we have
of the impact of nightlife activity and maintaining safe environments. to facilitate the implementation of effective based approaches and nightlife approaches. to have knowledge how these can be managed effectively and network and working on an international and national level so we have a number of different themes. there is certainly an alcohol on alcohol and tobacco and other drugs and how they impact the viernlt. and health and safety standards, emerging trends in club culture, international nightlife tourism, policy and policing and public safety and nightlife associated with nightlife venues, sexual health and preventing violence in these settings and these are a number of themes the commission deals with on a regular basis and as a franciscan i think san francisco has a fair amount to say how we manage it and bodies like the entertainment commission are ways to engage the nightlife and entertainment communities in productive ways and improve public health and public safety, so you have the fliers that has the dates. it's at the mark hopkins hotel and it's going to start on may
at grocery stores or imposed fees for using them. at issue is their effect on the environment. >> reporter: you won't find blastic bags at the checkout counter at bob's market in southern california. they are banned in 50 cities and counties across the state. francine shops with her own reusable bag and wants more communities to enforce similar bans. >> if they went through a garbage dump or a trash site and saw what was going on they would think twice about it. >> reporter: supporters of the ban say plastic bags crowd land fills, pollute streets and waterways and threaten marine life. where plastic is banned like here in santa monica, stores go through piles of paper bags. those also take a toll on the environment but about 50% do get recycled. that's compared to about 5% of plastic bags. but manufacturers say banning the bags is unfair. >> the amount of litter nationally that plastic bags produce is less than half of 1%. >> reporter: marine scientis is with the advocacy group heal the bay and says in los angeles plastic bags make up closer to 25%. >> litter on the streets gets washed thr
recommendation, without objection. item two. >> resolution authorizing department of environment a grant of 400,000 from united states department of environmental protection for preparing cleanup plans for potentially contaminated areas in southeast san francisco in support of the bluegreenway project for period of october 1st, 2012 through october 31, 2015. >> supervisor chu, supervisor avalos, mr. rodriguez, department of environment. we are here seeking your support of the resolution. it is a grant the department received from the epa to continue our brownfield project effort in the bay view and hunter's point community. this will allow us to go out and inventory brownfield sites, do site assessment, preliminary work and identify properties for potentially linking the blue greenway project to it. this is in partnership with port of san francisco, parks alliance in order to open up greater access to the southeastern waterfront . in addition this was announced with the epa as a companion effort. the epa awarded 400,000 in workforce training to hunter's park family and workforce for collaborati
of our preferences or the inability to control our preferences. we are victims of our environments growing up. we are victims of our context that we live in and, therefore, we all, you know, are not "responsible for that behavior and therefore should be mitigating." when you look at the testimony that comes in, whether it's from a mother or from neighbors or from teachers that are talking about really mitigating circumstances, they are the rotten social background kind of arguments, the abuse and the suffering that that individual experienced and those things show up in the brain. the brain is also a sponge. the brain isn't simply created by genetics and it's very much shaped by environment. and so my mentor john monaghan likened the problem of predicting violent people to predicting violent storms. when you think of meteorology, you think of the difficulty of classifying a hurricane and tracking a hurricane, making judgments about such complex behavior that has sort of chaotic premises underlying it, you're going to make lots of mistakes. you're going to make lots of mistakes in b
that produce the evidence-based are done in a sort of a cocoon environment that doesn't mirror, and then the research findings are reported in scientific studies that nobody reads or very few people read: a) because people don't have the time, b) because we almost purposely use language that nobody understands. so, unfortunately, i think these are key limitations to the real translation of research to practice in the field, and not just in behavioral health. dr. peterson, is that true for prevention as well? yes, i would say it is true for prevention as well. there are people who work in real-world settings who are interested in helping prevent problems from occurring-in this case, substance abuse or mental health issues-and they have a lot of constraints on their time. they have a lot of constraints on other resources-could be money, could be technology. and, in terms of bringing research to practice, things that are done in a laboratory or academic setting, if you will, sometimes are not readily translatable into real-world settings with those constraints happening and with a
to the the 14 guard members he interviewed. his report reads, sexual harassment and a hostile work environment is commonplace. >> you called this a big problem. >> uh-huh. >> shouldn't it be a big priority? >> sure. should always be a big priority when you find these kinds of things. >> do you believe this information embarrasses the national guard? >> yes. >> all day long. >> it substantiates our claim. >> our investigation included interviews with nearly two does dozen members of the california guard all frustrated with the current culture. >> i have a mandate from the governor to change the culture. >> that was major general david baldwin at his formal confirmation hearing pledging to fix deep-rooted problems dating back several years. in a letter major general promised to fix the problems you talked about. >> did he keep his promise? >> no. >> remember to add here to the four principals of my command philosophy. >> through his spokesperson we're told he has a great story to tell but he declined to answer our questions on camera to answer the concerns of members of his guard. wondering why
to helman and nimruz province. very complex dynamic environment that we were operating in but before i begin it talk to you about the operational picture, i just want to give you a snapshot of afghanistan. when we got there i want to set the frame here so you understand what we're dealing with. afghanistan ranged 180th out of 1 86 on the world bank list of developed countries. 20 percent of the babies won't reach their first year of life. there is a 44 year life span for your average citizen. it has a less than 20 percent literacy rate and girls in afghanistan will marry by the time they are 15 and will likely birth their second child by the time they are 20. so this is the long-term effects of violence and civil wars within a failed state by every measure. the marines who are currently still in southwest afghanistan, they are surrounded by very conservative culture. in 2010, this is not true now but narco trafficking and helman province alone was the fourth largest trafficker of heroin in the world. the taliban controlled the region and this is the environment that the marines ca
in a statewide environment. i think the biggest thing for me, there's several scenarios that are challenging us, one of which and one of our fears, and it's been in the newspaper so it's not a secret, but one of the things that scares me as well is the united states is not really experienced what i would call a global disaster yet. we have had disasters, i was in katrina on an urban search and rescue team, i've been in pretty much all major engagements as far as wild land fires in california, but if you look at a global disaster perspective where you have a hundred thousand victims like a tsunami or a large scale event, we have yet to experience that in this nation. i think the agreements we have here today and the relationships we develop today are going to be key to mitigate that. the other scenario that we are concerned with is a coordinated aerial incendiary attack by al qaeda. one of the things we've seen already in the european union is suspect of al qaeda starting fires in the eu if that happened in california in the right weather conditions, it would be disasterous and everybody in
to be a welcoming environment to people with special needs. >> there's an understanding here. it's very comforting for me. i feel at home when i come here. if he should freak out or have an episode or start screaming, i don't think anybody here will care. >> they also created a vocational training program where kids with special needs could develop skills they could use in every day life. >> the hardest thing in applying for a job is not having experience. particularly a problem for people with special needs, but for all of us who all of us, ap. my thought was to provide a first job or experience on a resume so that people could leave us with real-life job experience and a recommendation for another job. k i learned about team work and cooperation. i learned about organization. i learned a lot of skills here. >> he's not going to be protected for the rest of his life, he can't be. he's not going to be able to function that way, nor do i want him to. having this as a steppingstone to the real world is wonderful and invaluable to him and me as a parent. >> thanks so much for coming, really appreciat
and education about our waterfront, about the environment, about the balance of nature, and in the urban setting and of course it not have happened on the theme i will talk about the rest of my administration which is the team work that has to happen. we have rec and part that administers the bond. we have the port with its staff and byron and susan reynolds and working with public works to open up this area with the private sector whether it's ledge or the park advocates or the green space or the blue green advocates and this is all connected when i was taught during my dpb days and we had people walk along the water way and experience the wonderful, wonderful initial resources that we had, so all of these investments. >> >> will bring a lot of great use of open space to this area and not to forget we have a little off lease dog run that is also added in here for our dog lovers which there are countless many in the city and having an area where the dogs can play with their guardians and having a natural place for this to happen. you see all of the elements happening here and i want to thank
is bad for america and the environment. in january, president obama blocked the pipeline construction over concerns of how would it would impact the environment. the keystone would call from elberta, canada to texas. however, people are hoping for jobs. >> there are six people recovering in an accident after two helicopters collided on saturday this pasadena police helicopter equipped a second helicopter while one of them was landing. and the other helicopter was taking off. those five people, were taken to the hospital and treated and those injuries are not life-threatening. however, the pilots serious damage. >> the spacecraft has returned to earth this capsule touched down in kazakhstan after 127 days in orbit. the astronauts on board, one was from russia, japan, the u.s. toward they participated in the space walks, and over 40 different scientific experiments. this retirement capsule is that the only way that practice can get to/from the international space station. >> one hostess declared bankruptcy, the sales skyrocketed. and if you find yourself stockpiling you could be in for
of the environment and currently environmental law, but also as a resident of the city. the attempt with the new draft e-i-r impact report characterizes the golf course as unacceptable and has been refuted that san francisco historic advisory commission when there is a clear disagreement such as this, it is a clear indicator that a separate evaluation for the alternative plan is necessary to maintain [speaker not understood], almost done, and the endangered species within it. [speaker not understood] procedural resolution to ensure that the department up holds [speaker not understood] the golf course project from the natural area plan and allows for the environmental review. a yes vote will pave the way for the protection of humans and wildlife [speaker not understood] areas to rely -- >> thank you very much. >>> thank you so much. >> thanks a lot. good job squeezing it all into. >>> good afternoon, supervisors. my name is johnny baldini and my comment is in regards to the recreation and parks department, significant natural resource area management plan for which a final draft plan was approved
money. i'm john. >>> coming up reusable grocery bags are good for the environment but are they good for your health? . >>> we'll tell you what that thing is if we ever can show it to you. how it ended up in one woman's bag and what could be in your bag, as well. all right. >>> stargazers you're going to like it out there tonight. we'll talk about what you may see in the skies over maryland coming up. >>> plus we'll tell you what was going on here. abc 2 news at 11:00 is back in just 60 seconds . >>> look at this. police are looking for a man seen in this video right here in a cape and a helmet jumping his dirt bike over a landmark right in front of the county circuit court building in downtown bel air. the video was posted on you tube titled evil kanevil lives in bel air. one man who recorded the trick says he's convinced who this really was. >> he's evil kanevil, my childhood he row. it's got to be him. i mean, everybody said this is to alife, why can't this be evil kanevil. >> oh, he's in so much trouble. if police find him the driver could face several charges. >>> well, for many
heidi, the environment clearly a global challenge, clearly a part of the foreign policy. how does it fit into the economic statecraft? >> it fits into a lot of different things the state department is working on. what we as a relatively new office of seven months and only a few people have been working on are much more than the sort of geographic priorities that the secretary has highlighted, so i probably wouldn't be the best person to speak to this department with a whole host of environmental issues. a lot more time on the year autozone and the relationship and then there's a little bit of a list from the economic analysis perspective that we tend to spend most of our time on. >> all of the subjects but maybe everybody else would like a chance to do that, too. questions? i think there is a microphone here. is there another mic? going once -- if people don't have questions i will ask them. okay. >> the council of the land that. one of the things that we observed both in the atlanta environment and looking at the global companies that has to do with our competitive edge advantage in col
environment will remain unfavorable. in addition, the committee believes that the effective supply capacity of the economy is likely to continue to grow slowly over the forecast period. in october, cpi inflation picked up to 2.7%, partly as a result of higher university tuition fees. the committee's best collective judgment of the outlook for cpi inflation is summarized in chart 3 on page 8 of the report and is based on the same assumptions about monetary policy as chart 1. inflation is likely to remain above target for the first part of the forecast period and is higher than in august reflecting recent outturns and the announcement of large increases in household energy prices. further declines in inflation not being checked by price increases in sectors where market influences are weak. the rising student tuition fees alone added over not .3 percentage points to yesterday's inflation figure and do pestic gas and electricity prices are raising faster than wholesale energy prices. such factors are pushing inflation -- >> the point mervyn king is making there that part of the reason inflatio
in that environment. >> along those lines, michael, what are you waiting for to get back into the stock market in a bigger way right now and get out of bonds? >> i think have you to have the cyclical trade outperform. emerging markets are pretty resilient here. i think that's bullish. you also need to have bond yields rise. we see the ten-year back at 161 despite every single effort by the federal reserve to force reflags back into the system. the bond market has to believe the fed is going to be effective. >> so, for the foreseeable future, you're waiting for some sort of sign the economy -- the growth in the economy and reflation effort is going to take hold, is that it? >> the market has to believe it's going to be enough, by way of context. the fall from apple from peak to where it is now is $100 billion of market cap. $40 billion a month. the numbers are so billing and yet the federal reserve talks in billions when we live in a world of trillions. >> so what's the -- what's the best plan here, then, toward year-end? we have the clarity of the president in the white house but we have no cl
technologies allow natural gas producers to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. till you finish your vegetables. [ clock ticking ] [ male announcer ] there's a better way... v8 v-fusion. vegetable nutrition they need, fruit taste they love. could've had a v8. or...try kids boxes! could've had a v8. music is a universal language. but when i was in an accident... i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. information on my phone. connection to doctors who get where i'm from. and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never missed a beat. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health
home long a market in an environment where there's -- well, there was uncertainty, obviously, until last the presidency. now we have, you know, continued trauma with what's going on in europe in addition to what's going to happen in washington. clearly, there's just a further divide between one side and the other. that just poses itself that the markets are going to be heading lower. people want to take off. they're not going to be exposed overnight. during the day, it's a lot of back and forth ping-pong and people looking at single stock games and trying to do the best they can. >> yeah, unfortunately all of this uncertainty has led to this sharp decline since the election. s&p capital iq says the market value of all companies on publicly traded exchanges of the major exchanges has dropped by $750 just since november 5th. brian singer, let me ask you about that. would you be poised to put money to work in this selloff, or do you want to get to the sidelines until the dust settles? >> generally speaking, i think the environment is one where you want to look for an opportunity to act
slide. what this burlap will do to protect this environment to protect another-a-month sli mud slide when i take a picture of this check, it goes straight to the bank. oh. oh look the lion is out! no mommy no! don't worry honey, it only works on checks. deposit checks from your smartphone with chase quickdeposit. just snap a picture, hit send and done. take a step forward and chase what matters. .secondhand smoke affects everyone's health. it's not just irritating. it can cause heart disease and even death. speak up about secondhand smoke. your health and the health of your family depend on it. um, since when does a letter from a church mena that a person doesn't have to follow the law? there should be background checks that every festival were a kid are involved. we like to know what you think of the big daddy stories. go to our facebook fan page. our big- stories of the day.... look at you guys with your fancy-schmancy u-verse high speed internet. you know, in my day you couldn't just start streaming six ways to sunday. you'd get knocked off. and sometimes, it took a minute to down
where we all count on each other. it's a stimulating environment if you like change and rapid change, amazon is a great place to be. >> rose: beyond what you have said characterize the culture of amazon today. >> well, i would say that the culture of amazon starts with an externally facing culture looking at customers as our touchstone. so companies can be kind of competitor focused. and that approach can be successful. or i think they can start with the customer and that can also be successful. so some companies have kind of a conqueror mentality. if you look at their annual strategic plan it starts with their three top enemies and who they are going to crush this year. and some companies, and certainly amazon is in this group. we have an explorer mentality. so we like to go pioneering. we like to find dark alleyways and wander down them and see if they open up into broad avenues. and sometimes they do. with that pine earring exploring mentality is what drives us. the core of the culture. and over the years it's self-selecting. the people who thrive at amazon and stay at amazon and
damage was being done to the environment that, in fact, was really occurring. acknowledging those lies, b.p. has agreed to plead guilty to felony obstruction of congress. make no mistake, while the company is guilty, individuals committed these crimes. and we have also unsealed today a 23-count indictment charging b.p.'s two highest ranking supervisors aboard the deepwater horizon with manslaughter and violation of the clean water act. the two b.p. well site leaders are charged with negligence and gross negligence on the evening of april 20, 2010. in the face of glaring red flags indicating that the well was not secure, both men allegedly fail told take appropriate action to prevent the blowout. a separate indictment was also unsealed today, charging a former senior b.p. executive, david rainy, with obstructing a congressional investigation and making false statements to law enforcement officials. the indictment alleges that rainy, on behalf of b.p., intentionally underestimated the amount of oil flowing from the well. rainy allegedly cherry picked pages from documents, withheld other doc
be thriving in an environment where lots of people are worried about their taxes going up year end and the fiscal cliff is starting to get top of mind. you have a stock like walmart which has been a juggernaut, going up in a straight line since april until the recent pullback. then there is a company like -- sell, sell, sell. jcpenney. if you thought things couldn't get worse for jcpenney under the ceo, well, you were very wrong. as the company missed estimates once again on friday, reporting absolutely hideous numbers, they were blinding. sure enough, penney's continued the decline today, down another $2.67, 13%. like the wheel of fortune, where she stops, nobody knows. far more important, just so you know, there is a piece of preferred, there is another corporate piece of paper affiliated with jcpenney and that is sinking like a stone. that is more valuable to tell how bad things at jcpenney are. johnson tried to revolutionize by getting rid of coupons, cutting price as cross the board, they failed tragically and they started issuing coupons again. customers don't trust them. jc
. >> easier for a thief because of the sheer volume. it becomes a target-rich environment for thieves. >> ama: this year the holiday shopping season is starting even earlier. at least two major retailers, sears and wal-mart, are going to open on thanksgiving. >> a new study says climate change has the wild coffee plant headed for extinction as soon as the year 2080. scientist in london ran computer models on global warning. the scientists say if their worst estimates come true in 68 years there would be nowhere on earth suit even for wild coffee growth. it could mean stinks of even beans grown on farms. >> two bay area teenagers are about to take on the nation in competition of wits, intelligence and inning -- inning future. >> thomas and joey made it to the national finals in map sciences and technology. the pair advanced for their research that could help improve the treatment and prevention of lung cancer, and not only are the students start, they're positive. >> you always miss 100% of the shots you don't take, so take a shot and then become part of this wonderful experience where you lea
the teachers are the ones that set the tone whether we have a respectable environment or and not part of that is education and we have to educate the adults that spend time with the kids and the federal government will come up with the giens and 37 factors or 40 and frankly most of us won't remember and unless we're prosecuting and looking for the elements of the crime and whether we're going to file a case or not. i i think we need to be more global than this and this works and we need to illustrate the things that aren't acceptable? what is the impact on the victim? what is the impact on everyone else? and working together to solve the problem. >> nancy. >> in some school districts and teachers when i brought up this issue i get back "you're not going to change kids being kids. some kids will pick on other kids and in the dynamic girls will be friends today and the queen bee will turn away from some girl and the enemy today and tomorrow it's somebody else, and again i agree with george and so much of this is the responsibilities falls on those adults who actually have a bird's ey
and how you respect your neighbors and the environment and distance between buildings and in addition to revoking that letter we're saying put conditions on that strip of land so whoever owns it, it is maintained as open space because currently with the variance and the september letter it's possible for the owner of lot 38 to build on that land and i have pictures of the light through windows on that property line and it's helpful to understand that as well. i hope that helps. >> okay. please proceed with your rebuttal. i address addressing the questions. >> thank you and just because the permits are issued and it's not a legal lot and it was written in numerous letters in the past. we did inform the zoning administrator when we requested the letter confirming what's happened in the past and the subdivision of the lots in 1954 and 55. we did inform the zoning administrator we would be applying for condoization. we would be going through that process and that we wanted to use this process of getting the planning department to weigh in on the historical subdivision to better und
, a lot of pedestrian access. a lot of it doesn't work well. it's constrained environment. the infrastructure is out dated and not much improved since the original design and structure of it as things were built. there were incremental changes recently and conflict at the site between the transit and transportation modes. i see one of the basic conflicts there. there is a sense that this site is maintenance yard, maintenance facility for muni as well as a place for tens of thousands of people go through on a daily basis either in their cars or on foot and bike, but mostly by transit riders and that's the basic conflict, but there are many other conflicts that go on there. pedestrian issues are difficult especially if you're a person with a disability. there is limited signage how to get around. it's limited. we don't have electricity to run next muni there. the list goes on and on and it's something i committed time and effort to actually make sure that we can have something move forward. it's really hard to coordinate all the different entities from cal transes to
and departments so i have a lot of experience of working on collaborative environments and teams and tight deadlines and limited resources and i think i bring a unique demographic perspective to this community. i am in my 20's and asian and professional and i use transit and plugged into the network and a huge constituency in san francisco and i'm a traveler and worldwide transit rider and don't have a car and adult literacy tutor and head of the homeowner association and providing work for poor people around the world and i would like to be more civically engaged and i think this is a great way to do it, and i feel i can bring a lot to the table and i would really appreciate your selection of me to be on the citizens advisory committee for the sf cac. thank you very much. >> thank you. thank you for your presentation. colleagues any other comments or comments? >> can i ask a question? i notice you work in palo alto. how do you get there? >> we have a corporate shuttle and occasionally use cal train as well. >> thank you. >> okay. we can open this up for public comment. any member of
that switch backs are valid and necessary given the operating environment. they have worked on reducing the switchbacks and keeping the public informed and would further denigate service and safety. the jury answers, "that's what we're getting at that muni think it is switch backs are a normal way of business". other transportation systems were aghast, appalled that a transit system could inconvenience their customers so cavalierly and we want them to have the feeling that we are doing a good job" when they deem them unavoidable. recommendation two, contact and learn from paris not resorting to switchbacks regularly. muni agrees there is room for improvement and they will reach out to their peers to study their standard operating procedures but note the claim that others are using procedures similar to muni. the jury answers "the jury approves part of the response about contacting peers. we hope that you contact those systems that were on our list. these systems are seen by the controller as being similar to muni, and have higher reliability and passenger ratings than muni. if
. that is a common theme we have heard. we're also helping the environment because it takes cars off the road. less people have to own cars. never having owned a car, i think that is a good thing. it helps me live a healthier lifestyle. i am excited to be on the panel. >> thanks, jessica. i was putting together a presentation recently with the logos of companies in the sharing economy on the map near our office at eco dash working place --at a coworking place. i counted 20 share economy places in my neighborhood. there are new companies launched every week. this is just a small sample, some the leaders in san francisco. jay, give us some background on the sharing economy working group and how you think it benefits san francisco, including underserved communities. >> it is historic we are being thoughtful, looking forward in shaping the policies. mayor lee and board president david chiu and the supervisors announced the sharing economy working group. the idea is to look at the issues at play as well as understand the benefits of the sharing economy, whether environmental or economic. you can see wit
director of environment in our city has issued a goal for 2020, being mission -- emission free, carbon neutral. that is something that when you think about the economic impact of these new business models, it can contribute quite greatly to that. i am going to answer the question a little bit differently -- i have been inspired by this space considerably. there's a lot more opportunity. cars, so many assets we have in our society. as a city, we own buildings, cubicles, museums, golf courses, so much that we have -- >> yes, but it is our property, right? >> yes. that is a very good point. stewards of these resources, and they are often underutilized resources, so how do we improve access to those? there is a lot to learn from this that could be applied to the public comments. >> thank you. let's open it up. do we have a microphone for people to come to? ok, we will just it old school. if you have a question, raise your hand, and speak loudly. concise questions will be greatly appreciated. >> [inaudible] >> did everyone here that? ok. >> something that is really amazing about the sharing
it comes to or shared values, marriage equality, environment. we are a becon to the rest of the world when it comes to our sports. i was proud a couple years ago to carry the legislation around america's cup bid to work with mayor lee to work with the warriors. i'm particularly pleased to work with supervisor ferrell and 49ers organization to make sure we win this bid. in my first couple weeks i put in a call to a young man named jed york. along with colleagues who were new in 2009 we asked you to consider sticking around in the city. while we may someday curse you for stop take our blessed team out of the city, we love the fact we are working together on this bid. we love that our 49er also continue to play great football down the street. we love the fact we still have hometown pride in the best football team in the franchise. thank you. looking forward to getting this done. [applause] >> i want to reiterate two points and open up to questions, if you have them for the folks up here. this will be the most shared super bowl super bowl bid ever. that is the key, hash tag super bowl and help
creates a welcoming environment for everybody. there is no cultural barrier to entry. >> the demographic of people who come will match the demographic of the reader. it is very simple. if we want more people of color, you book more people of color. you want more women, your book more women. kind of like that. it gets mixed up a little bit. in general, we kind of have a core group of people who come every month. their ages and very. we definitely have some folks who are straight. >> the loyal audience has allowed michelle to take more chances with the monthly lineup. established authors bring in an older audience. younker authors bring in their friends from the community who might be bringing in an older author. >> raider has provided a stage for more than 400 writers. it ranges from fiction to academics stories to academic stories this service the underground of queer fell, history, or culture. >> and there are so many different literary circles in san francisco. i have been programming this reading series for nine years. and i still have a huge list on my computer of people i need to ca
, i wanted a place. >> we care about each other, and it's going to be good in a group environment like this and live together. it geesd. >> 75 residents will be moving in over the next couple of weeks. the developers want to end veteran homelessness. money to build this facility came from the state, the city, and from private funds. >>> well, happy birthday to the bay bridge. the bridge is 76 years old today. this is video taken when the bay bridge first opened back in 1936, six months before the golden gate bridge. it was designed by charles purcell and built by the american bridge company. among those in attendance for the opening of the bridge 76 years ago, the former u.s. president herbert hoover, senator william mechanic due and the governor of california. bay bridge was the largest and most expensive brej of its time and now the new eastern span of the bridge is set to open at the end of 2013. >>> in sports tonight, monday night football goes into overtime. the steelers quarterback ben roth lis berger leaves the game and stadium with an injury. and the 49ers face the immediate fu
? the academy does not prepare you for that. i take that experience and i realized in the gang environment, most of these youths are coming from single- family households. in the area where the gang violence is most prevalent, great citizens of the community, 99% of those citizens are afraid. as a prosecutor, i take this experience and figure out how i want to enforce gang violence, especially in san francisco. i break it down into three categories. you have the individual who is not fully immersed in the gang lifestyle. he is just an associate comment just hanging out. -- associates, just hanging out. for that individual, we try to work with community-based programs. i've met with dcyf, the african- american steering committee, people haven't been in this violence and i say to them, what can -- people have been in this violence, and i say to them, what can we do to make sure if this individual does not go to prison? for that individual, we try to find a way to keep him out of the prison sentence. then you have the second individual, the individual who does crimes not for economic means, but for
. >>> environment 58 researchers from southeast asia are sounding the alarm over marine pollution. they gathered in jakarta to share their research into the state of local seas. the indonesian government organized the seminar with the japan sociy fo the pmoti of science. about 150 people attended. japanese researchers say they found plastic garbage last year in the stomach of a seal of indones indonesia's island. they say the garbage can easily accumulate on the deep sea floor as currents are weak. some researchers say they found metals in the seabed in the manila bay and others reported finding chemicals in the java sea much indonesia. >>> emerging economic powers stilltruggling with poverty. emboldened citizens demanding democracy, the threat of violence, the push for peace, the shadow of conflict. get news and insight on south and southeast asia every weekday live from bangkok, only on nhk world "newsline". >>> the mayor of an island in the east china sea is trying to diffuse a dispute over fishing rights. he is visiting taiwan to talk about access to waters off the senkaku islands. he admini
environment. as part of our goal of keeping our promises to familiesfÑñ?ñ?ñ we are continuing to implement ways to ensure that we have real time information, and data to continually support your child's academic growth. inc9ñp particular, you may recall that during the 2011-12 school year we implemented the common learning assessment, cla, district-wide in math and english language for grades 2-12 and spanish language arts for grades 2-8. these assessments align with the district's goals ofzhñ?ñ? providing ongoing assessment of student learning and ensuring equity andja//y# ñ access to rigorous academic content across the district. i have some exciting news that within the next couple of weeks parents you will be receiving your child'sxndvl individualized cla reports and results. these reports will beÑ up@q" in english, spanish, and in chinese. and on the report you will be able to see your child's performance levels in the subject material. ourtc>@láu hope is that this will provide to families andyéñ?ñ?ñ teachers
adult professionals in workplace environment. >>> sort of like mentors. >> what was so exciting about spark it's only program where we have students going to the workplace. >> cheryl: so underserved kids and they see another side of the world? >> as a middle school student sitting next to an engineer in one of top tech companies here. >> cheryl: that is fantastic. i know that it is hard, seventh and eighth graders? >> we discovered the middle grades are really the time when students are dipping in engagement. we are seeing that there are far fewer resources for middle school students. so spark is targeting seventh and eighth graders and so they are ultimately graduating in time. we know that early warning signs of high school graduation is fundamental abcs, coming to school, attendance and behavior in school. we know it happens way before they enter the ninth grade. >> cheryl: who are some of the apprenticeships with? >> we have some other companies down in the bay area. some of the names are competitively applying for jobs. >> cheryl: how do you sign up for this? how does one get inv
came all the way from israel to meet the people and hang out and she was amazing. >> the environment, the people, everything. it is like everyone has so much energy. >> hey, you are beautiful. and i love you. >> why? because... it is definitely a lot more fun than being inside. >> so far we have had zero problems. it is a long-step process, a lot of thinking and people involved. so we think that we got rid of all of the problems that could happen. they are doing it, and we are doing it and everybody is doing the best that they can. >> it is a wonderful out reach >> come. >> it is beautiful. ♪ >> we are here at j.c. plumbing. you are going to show was plumbing fixtures. >> yes, we are. very excited to have you. >> let's look at fixtures and faucets and accessories. it is going to be very exciting here. please join us for "bluilding sf." joining janessa and i today is andre. thanks for coming. we have had some great times in the past with some of these shows. you have been kitchen and bath in the past. >> i'm an architect. i do a lot of construction work. or >> do people look for whe
, is 16,967 for delivery of this support of the housing environment. so happy to answer any questions you might have about this item. >> thank you very much. why don't we go to the budget analyst report on item 8. >> good afternoon, chair chu and members of the committee. as mr. updike said, this is the option to extend first of two ten-year options of master lease of star hotel, serving 54 clients. under the lease the first year rent would increase by 3%. annual adjustment based on cpi that would range from 3% to no more than 6%. fiscal year 2012 and 2013 costs are 388,256. this is included in the dph budget. we recommend approval. >> thank you very much. why don't we open this for public comment. are there members of the public what wish to speak on item number 8? >> thank you, supervisors, tom king. again this goes back to opening comment. when you are online and looking at the agenda, it would be great to have a link from the items to -- what i just heard, both preventers haddockments that would have been helpful to review prior to coming here because otherwise members of the public w
Search Results 89 to 188 of about 739 (some duplicates have been removed)